Posted 1 day ago

whitehouse:

“Forty-five years ago, while the world watched as one, the United States of America set foot on the moon. It was a seminal moment not just in our country’s history, but the history of all humankind.” —President Obama on meeting with the Apollo 11 crew and their families to mark the 45th anniversary of the first lunar landing.

todaysdocument:

Apollo 11 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin make the first moonwalk, on July 20, 1969.

In these clips they can been seen planting the U.S. Flag on the lunar surface and experimenting with various types of movement in the Moon’s lower gravity, including loping strides and kangaroo hops.

Moonwalk One, ca. 1970

From the series: Headquarters’ Films Relating to Aeronautics, 1962 - 1981. Records of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1903 - 2006

via Media Matters » Stepping Stones to the Moon

Posted 1 day ago
pocketphyl:

brainy-isthenew-sexy:

not-a-comedian:



I’M NOT EVEN IN THIS FANDOM BUT HERE’S A PRESENT TO MY FOLLOWERS WHO ARE

HOW ARE YOU NOT IN THE LOTR FANDOM

pocketphyl:

brainy-isthenew-sexy:

not-a-comedian:

image

I’M NOT EVEN IN THIS FANDOM BUT HERE’S A PRESENT TO MY FOLLOWERS WHO ARE

HOW ARE YOU NOT IN THE LOTR FANDOM

(Source: littleboycutyourhair)

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 2 days ago
Posted 4 days ago

commandmodulepilot:

45 years ago, three astronauts blasted off on a mission to put man on the moon.

Posted 4 days ago

elysean:

Broken moon of what?
I KNOW, I KNOW.

Posted 5 days ago
venusianw:

Ever wanted to know what an extraterrestrial impact looks like from space? 
Based on Galileo data, this gif shows what the fireball from Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment K would have looked like in real time. To make it, I composited data taken from the jailbar images of fragment K’s impact and the full-globe images of Jupiter taken for the fragment W impact.
The fireball rapidly climbs to peak brightness in only 5 seconds, as fragment K, a chunk of ice and dust over 1km in size decelerates from 60km/s to zero in moments. The amount of energy released was equivalent to 6 million megatons of TNT (or roughly 600 times the destructive power of the entire world’s nuclear arsenal in the 1990s). At 5 seconds, the fireball is already about 1000km across and positively glowing at a temperature of 24000K, the temperature of a lightning bolt. By the time the fireball fades out of sight about 40 seconds later, it has expanded to cover nearly 20,000km^2 and fallen to the comparatively cool temperature of 1000K.
While the impact site faded out within a minute of the impact in visible light, if people were able to see infrared light, the fireball would have been visible for much longer. In fact, the fireball didn’t reach peak brightness in the infrared until nearly 3 1/2 minutes after the impact, and continued glowing brightly for hours afterwards.
Today is the 20th anniversary of Fragment K’s impact with Jupiter. Tomorrow, I hope to have a similar image for Fragment N, which was also imaged by Galileo.

venusianw:

Ever wanted to know what an extraterrestrial impact looks like from space?

Based on Galileo data, this gif shows what the fireball from Shoemaker-Levy 9 fragment K would have looked like in real time. To make it, I composited data taken from the jailbar images of fragment K’s impact and the full-globe images of Jupiter taken for the fragment W impact.

The fireball rapidly climbs to peak brightness in only 5 seconds, as fragment K, a chunk of ice and dust over 1km in size decelerates from 60km/s to zero in moments. The amount of energy released was equivalent to 6 million megatons of TNT (or roughly 600 times the destructive power of the entire world’s nuclear arsenal in the 1990s). At 5 seconds, the fireball is already about 1000km across and positively glowing at a temperature of 24000K, the temperature of a lightning bolt. By the time the fireball fades out of sight about 40 seconds later, it has expanded to cover nearly 20,000km^2 and fallen to the comparatively cool temperature of 1000K.

While the impact site faded out within a minute of the impact in visible light, if people were able to see infrared light, the fireball would have been visible for much longer. In fact, the fireball didn’t reach peak brightness in the infrared until nearly 3 1/2 minutes after the impact, and continued glowing brightly for hours afterwards.

Today is the 20th anniversary of Fragment K’s impact with Jupiter. Tomorrow, I hope to have a similar image for Fragment N, which was also imaged by Galileo.

Posted 1 week ago

Kerbal Space Program: First Contract Now Available

kerbaldevteam:

image

Kerbal Space Program, the award-winning, indie space agency sim game from Squad, is launching its latest update, Kerbal Space Program: First Contract, as part of its active development cycle. This major release, numbered 0.24, is a substantial advancement in the game’s Career Mode, which…

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

Imaging a Cometary Impact

venusianw:

As I mentioned in last night’s post about Shoemaker-Levy 9, the Galileo orbiter was already on its way to Jupiter when the comet was discovered. It was also well-placed to see the impacts occur, since they would take place on the side of the planet facing the probe. There was one big drawback -…