Posted 5 hours ago

All things will pass in time.

(Source: ricktimus)

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 2 days ago

Some new footage of Guardians of the Galaxy.

Tonight was pretty awesome!  

Posted 3 days ago

westcoastavenger:

tormentedfantasy:

caleia:

sometimes im really excited about things and i want to tell everyone but then i remember nobody cares and i just sit there like

image

to tell or not to tell

This is me on so many levels.

Me about a lot of things. But I force my friends to listen to me. XD

Very true.

(Source: riveille)

Posted 3 days ago

pennyfornasa:

 
“To provide for research into problems of flight within and outside the earth’s atmosphere, and for other purposes.” - National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958

On July 29th, 1958 — ten months after Sputnik 1 was launched into orbit — President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act. Beginning operations later that year, NASA entered the highly competitive Space Race against the Soviet Union. Culminating with the success of Apollo, the economic benefits and technological advances during NASA’s first decade were immediately felt. Since 1958, twelve astronauts have walked on the Moon, four rovers and four landers have touched down on the Martian soil, and most recently, Voyager I became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Perhaps the greatest achievement of this agency, however, has been the success of the International Space Station. Astronauts from various space agencies across the planet have been living and studying aboard the ISS since 2000. NASA has had a rich history, but an even more promising future awaits.

Today, on the anniversary of the National Aeronautics and Space Act, join us by writing Congress to express the importance of raising the minuscule NASA budget to a level that will ensure a strong future for all humanity.

Sign the petition, spread the word:
www.penny4nasa.org/take-action

Read the National Aeronautics and Space Act:
http://history.nasa.gov/spaceact.html
Posted 4 days ago

spaceplasma:

Animations of Saturn’s aurorae

Earth isn’t the only planet in the solar system with spectacular light shows. Both Jupiter and Saturn have magnetic fields much stronger than Earth’s. Auroras also have been observed on the surfaces of Venus, Mars and even on moons (e.g. Io, Europa, and Ganymede). The auroras on Saturn are created when solar wind particles are channeled into the planet’s magnetic field toward its poles, where they interact with electrically charged gas (plasma) in the upper atmosphere and emit light. Aurora features on Saturn can also be caused by electromagnetic waves generated when its moons move through the plasma that fills the planet’s magnetosphere.  The main source is the small moon Enceladus, which ejects water vapor from the geysers on its south pole, a portion of which is ionized. The interaction between Saturn’s magnetosphere and the solar wind generates bright oval aurorae around the planet’s poles observed in visible, infrared and ultraviolet light. The aurorae of Saturn are highly variable. Their location and brightness strongly depends on the Solar wind pressure: the aurorae become brighter and move closer to the poles when the Solar wind pressure increases.

Credit: ESA/Hubble (M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada)

Posted 4 days ago
explorationimages:

Rosetta:  Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko rotating.  APOD caption:

 Explanation:  
Why does this comet’s nucleus have two components?

The surprising discovery that 
Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has a double nucleus came 
late last week as 
ESA's robotic interplanetary spacecraft 
Rosetta continued 
its approach toward the ancient comet’s core.

Speculative ideas on how the double core was created include, currently, that 
Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko is actually the result of the merger of two comets, that 
the comet is a 
loose pile of rubble pulled apart by 
tidal forces, 
that ice evaporation on the comet has been asymmetric, 
or that the comet has undergone some sort of explosive event.

Pictured above, the comet’s unusual 5-km sized comet nucleus is seen rotating over the course of a few hours, with each frame taken 20-minutes apart.

Better images — and hopefully more refined theories — are expected as 
Rosetta 
is on track to enter orbit around 
Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko's nucleus early next month, 
and by the end of the year, if possible, 
land a probe on it. 


Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team; MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

explorationimages:

Rosetta: Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko rotating. APOD caption:

Explanation: Why does this comet’s nucleus have two components? The surprising discovery that Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko has a double nucleus came late last week as ESA's robotic interplanetary spacecraft Rosetta continued its approach toward the ancient comet’s core. Speculative ideas on how the double core was created include, currently, that Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko is actually the result of the merger of two comets, that the comet is a loose pile of rubble pulled apart by tidal forces, that ice evaporation on the comet has been asymmetric, or that the comet has undergone some sort of explosive event. Pictured above, the comet’s unusual 5-km sized comet nucleus is seen rotating over the course of a few hours, with each frame taken 20-minutes apart. Better images — and hopefully more refined theories — are expected as Rosetta is on track to enter orbit around Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko's nucleus early next month, and by the end of the year, if possible, land a probe on it.
Image Credit: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team; MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA
Posted 5 days ago
Posted 5 days ago

maikevierkant:

Space Foxes (because space animals are fun).
Edit: Prints now available here!

Space Bunnies

Space Turtles

Space Koalas

Posted 6 days ago

WTF  How did we almost have a new Shirley Bassey 007 song!!!?  I don’t hate “Another Way to Die” but maaan, this would’ve been irresistible, its even co-composed by the film composer, like it should be.  :(